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Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment - Yemen, Feb 2017

Subject/Objective: 
To gather more in-depth data on the IDP, returnee and host populations.
Methodology: 
The multi-cluster location assessment data was collected through physical visits to identified locations by existing TFPM field teams, where the key informants representing the community were interviewed.
Key findings: 
(Displacement Dynamics):  Generalised violence and armed conflict (no direct personal threat/attack)’ (41%) was reported by key informants as the main reason for displacement in identified IDP locations.  In identified returnee locations, lack of access to sustainable income (46%) and lack of access to basic services (28%) in the place of displacement were reported by key informants as the main push factors for return.  On the other hand, improved security (30%), lower housing/rent costs (25%) and intent to re-join family members (17%) were reported as the top pull factors for return.  With respect to long term intentions (beyond the next 3 months), 81% of key informants reported that IDPs intend to return to their place of origin. (Food):  Within identified IDP locations, key informants stated that the top three problems associated with access to food among IDPs and host communities were: price was too expensive (44% for IDPs, 45% for host community), distance i.e. too far or difficult to access by road (22% for IDPs, 23% for host community), and quantity i.e. insufficient or inconsistent supply in the markets (17% for both IDPs and host community).  By comparison, among identified returnee locations, key informants specified that the top three problems associated with access to food among returnees and host communities were: price was too expensive (54% for returnees and host community), quantity i.e. insufficient or inconsistent supply in the markets (15% for returnees and host community), and quality i.e. not fresh or poor quality (11% for returnees, 12% for host community). (Nutrition):  In identified IDP locations, 78% of key informants confirmed the presence of children in the community who were becoming sick/thin, or had swelling in their feet due to lack of sufficient food to eat; while 79% confirmed the presence of mothers in the community who were becoming sick because they did not have enough food to eat.  By comparison, in identified returnee locations, 69% of key informants confirmed the presence of children in the community who were becoming sick/thin, or had swelling in their feet due to insufficient food to eat; while 69% confirmed the presence of mothers in the community who were becoming sick due to insufficient food. (Health):  Malnutrition, diarrheal diseases and malaria were reported in identified IDP locations as the most commonly suffered illnesses among IDPs. In the same locations, the top three types of health facilities that currently exist were reported as: no health facilities exist (30%), health unit (27%) and private clinic (16%).  Diarrheal diseases, malnutrition and acute respiratory infections were reported as the most commonly suffered illnesses among returnees. In the same returnee locations, the top three types of health facilities that currently exist were reported as: no health facilities exist (22%), private clinic (22%) and hospital (16%). (Shelter):  The top three shelter problems faced by IDPs in identified locations included: overcrowding (31%), inability to afford rent (17%) and materials to build or undertake repairs to homes were too expensive (14%).  The top three shelter needs of IDPs in identified locations were: temporary shelter solutions such as family tents (23%), shelter materials (22%) and rental subsidies (16%).  The top three shelter problems faced by returnees in identified locations included: homes were damaged but still habitable (26%), materials to build or undertake repairs were too expensive (17%), inability to afford rent (16%) and overcrowding (14%).  The top three shelter needs of returnees in identified locations were: shelter materials - emergency shelter kits (24%), rental subsidies (22%) and winterization materials (21%). (NFIs):  Within identified IDP locations, key informants stated that the top three NFI priority needs among IDP men were: blankets (23%), mattresses (18%) and clothes/ bedding (both at 11%); whereas among IDP women the top three NFI priority needs were: kitchen sets (22%), blankets (14%) and clothes (13%).  IDPs face the following problems with accessing household items/NFIs in these locations: price i.e. they cannot afford household items (46%), distance i.e. distribution sites/shops are too far and difficult to access by road (20%).  Turning to identified returnee locations, key informants stated that the top three NFI priority needs among returnee men were: blankets (20%), fuel (15%) and bedding equipment/mattresses (both at 11%); whereas among returnee women the top three NFI priority needs were: kitchen sets (24%), blankets (13%) and jerry cans (11%).  Returnees also face problems with accessing household items/NFIs in these locations, including: price i.e. they cannot afford household items (54%), poor quality items (17%), and quality i.e. distance i.e. distribution sites/shops are too far and difficult to access by road (10%). (WASH):  Among identified IDP locations, key informants indicated that just 47% of IDPs and 50% of the host community had access to at least 15 litres/day of potable water. Meanwhile, key informants stated that only 67% of IDPs and 71% of the host community had access to sanitation facilities (toilets and showers).  In the identified returnee locations, key informants specified that just 55% of returnees and 54% of non-displaced community members had access to at least 15 litres/day of potable water. With respect to access to sanitation facilities (toilets and showers), key informants indicated that 82% of returnees and 84% of the non-displaced community members enjoyed access to sanitation facilities. (Livelihoods):  In identified IDP locations, key informants also revealed that the top three crisis-related factors affecting IDP and host community livelihoods were: security situation / safety (28% for IDPs, 31% for host community); increase in prices of productive resources (26% for IDPs, 24% for host community); and destruction of essential infrastructure i.e. irrigation, roads, utilities (11% for IDPs, 10% for host communities).  The same pattern was observed in identified returnee locations where key informants stated that the top three crisis-related factors affecting livelihoods of returnee and non-displaced community members were: security situation / safety (32% for returnees, 33% for non-displaced community members); increase in prices of productive resources (24% for returnees, 25% for non-displaced community members); and destruction of essential infrastructure i.e. irrigation, roads, utilities (11% for returnees, 10% for non-displaced community members). (Education):  In identified IDP locations, 64% of key informants indicated that school aged boys (i.e. 6 to 17 years old) attend school on a regular basis, while just 54% stated that school aged girls regularly attend school.  In identified returnee locations, the gender disparity was not as wide, as 60% of key informants indicated that school aged boys (i.e. 6 to 17 years old) regularly attend school, while 54% stated that school aged girls do so. (Protection):  Among IDP locations surveyed, key informants reported the presence of significant numbers of IDP and host community members with specific vulnerabilities.  In surveyed returnee locations, key informants also reported the presence of returnees and non-displaced community members with specific vulnerabilities, albeit in smaller numbers. (Child Protection):  The top three harmful practices reported by key informants in IDP locations were: child labour (35%); child marriage (9%); and female genital mutilation (4%).  The top three harmful practices reported by key informants in returnee locations were: child labour (51%); child marriage (5%); and female genital mutilation (3%).
Sample size: 
6 family average
Assessment Report: 
Assessment Questionnaire: 
Publicly Available
Assessment Data: 
Publicly Available
Webspace(s): 
Assessment Date(s): 
20 Feb 2017
Frequency: 
Other
Status: 
Report completed
Unit(s) of Measurement: 
Community
Settlements
Households
Individuals
Collection Method(s): 
Key Informant Interview
Population Type(s): 
IDPs
Returnees
Host communities
Cluster(s)/Sector(s): 
Leading/Coordinating Organization(s): 
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
International Organization for Migration
Location(s): 
Hajjah City
Other location: 
All yemen governorates(The top 20% most populated locations with IDPs and returnees).
Theme(s): 
Conflict
Humanitarian Assistance
Natural Disasters
Needs Assessment
Rapid Response to Population Movements
Disaster(s)/Emergency: 
Yemen: Crisis 2015-2019