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Syrian Arab Republic: Summary of Humanitarian Response plan Monitoring Report, January-June 2018

Syrian Arab Republic: Summary of Humanitarian Response plan Monitoring Report, January-June 2018

Summary

The overall scale and complexity of humanitarian needs of people in Syria remain staggering in their magnitude and severity. Amidst an intensification of hostilities in multiple locations notably Idleb, Afrin, East Ghouta, southern Damascus, northern rural Homs and parts of northeast Syria, the first five months of 2018 witnessed more than one million population movements as civilians sought to escape hostilities. At the same time, some 6.2 million people remained in protracted displacement. Against the backdrop of relative stability in certain areas of the country, some 760,000 people spontaneously returned to their communities of origin, the majority of whom were IDPs. By the end of May 2018, some 13 million people were estimated to be in need of humanitarian assistance, including 5.2 million people in acute need. As in the previous seven years, violence, insecurity and shifting frontlines remained the principal driver of civilian displacement, resulting in acute and protracted humanitarian needs. The needs of 1.5 million people in UN-declared hard-to-reach areas remained particularly severe. The ability of humanitarian partners to reach millions of people in need continued to be hampered by intense hostilities, shifts in control, disruption of key access routes, extensive explosive hazard contamination, administrative impediments, deliberate restrictions and funding shortages. With many UN-declared besieged and contested areas coming under Government of Syria (GoS) control, sieges are no longer expected to remain a defining feature of the crisis. However, humanitarian access to areas that have witnessed changes in control continues to be constrained. This prevents a timely response to humanitarian needs that for the most part remain acute following the burden of living under siege for a protracted period. In these areas, a number of service providers and humanitarian workers have either been unable to continue supporting people in need or have fled these areas over concerns for their safety, noting that only limited assistance has been provided by SARC and some UN local partners. Looking ahead, humanitarian partners are extremely concerned by the catastrophic humanitarian implications for civilians of the potential for a full-scale military operation in northwest Syria. These concerns are exacerbated by the high population density in the northwest, combined with the likely absence of options available for these people to seek refuge and security in other areas. The evolving situation in northeast Syria is of further concern given large rates of return in unsafe conditions considering high levels of contamination. Humanitarian actors continue to also monitor developments in Afrin with concern regarding humanitarian needs and freedom of movement limitations.

Operation(s)/ Webspace(s): 
Organization(s): 
United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Original Publication Date: 
29 Aug 2018
Document type: 
Periodic Monitoring Report
Location(s): 
Syrian Arab Republic
Disaster(s)/Emergency: 
Syria: Crisis 2011-2020